Tricorne hat

From Cantr II Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Interwiki

българскиDeutschEnglishEspañolEsperantoFrançaisItalianoLietuviųLojbanNederlandsPolskaPortuguêsРусскийSuomiSvenskaTürkçe中文

Tricorne hat
Wool tricorne 1.jpg
A hat of wool cloth, its broad brim pinned up on either side of the head and at the back to produce a triangular shape.
Clothing
Categoryhats
Typewool clothing
Time1.5 day(s)
Resources150 grams of wool cloth
Objectsnone
Toolsneedle or bone needle
knife, bone knife or bronze knife
Machinesnone

Description

Default Description

"a hat of wool cloth, its broad brim pinned up on either side of the head and at the back to produce a triangular shape"

Details

Typically made from animal fiber, the more expensive being of beaver-hair felt and the less expensive of wool felt, the hat's most distinguishing characteristic is that three sides of the brim are turned up (cocked) and either pinned, laced, or buttoned in place to form a triangle around the crown.

Tricornes have a rather broad brim, pinned up on either side of the head and at the back, producing a triangular shape. The hat is typically worn with one point facing forward, but are sometimes worn pointed above the left eyebrow to allow better clearance for those bearing items (such as shovels, pole arms or crossbows) that rest high upon the left shoulder. The crown is low, unlike the steeple hat or top hat.

Tricornes range from the very simple and cheap to the extravagant, occasionally incorporating gold or silver lace trimming and feathers. In addition, military and naval versions usually bear a cockade or other national emblem at the front.

Historical Trivia

The tricorne style on Earth historically served two purposes: first, it allowed stylish gentlemen to show off the most current fashions of their wigs, and thus their social status; and secondly, the cocked hat, with its folded brim, was much smaller than other hats and therefore could be more easily tucked under an arm when going inside a building, where social etiquette dictated that a gentleman remove his hat. Tricornes with laced sides could have the laces loosened and the sides dropped down to provide better protection from the weather, sun, and rain.